Promissory Note Restored

I Promise

Greetings on this the Friday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time
Readings: Rom 15:14-21; PS 98:1, 2-3ab, 3cd-4; Lk 16:1-8
Notes: I must admit after all these years I did not understand this parable in the way it should be understood.

So today I said, let’s double check what I think it means versus what it actually means.

Oops.

Read then the guiding notes from the Biblical NABRE editors:

The parable of the dishonest steward has to be understood in the light of the Palestinian custom of agents acting on behalf of their masters and the usurious practices common to such agents. The dishonesty of the steward consisted in the squandering of his master’s property (Lk 16:1) and not in any subsequent graft. The master commends the dishonest steward who has forgone his own usurious commission on the business transaction by having the debtors write new notes that reflected only the real amount owed the master (i.e., minus the steward’s profit). The dishonest steward acts in this way in order to ingratiate himself with the debtors because he knows he is being dismissed from his position (Lk 16:3). The parable, then, teaches the prudent use of one’s material goods in light of an imminent crisis.

First reading
Those who have never been told of him shall see,
and those who have never heard of him shall understand.

Responsorial Psalm
The Lord has revealed to the nations his saving power.

The LORD has made his salvation known:
in the sight of the nations he has revealed his justice.
He has remembered his kindness and his faithfulness
toward the house of Israel.

Alleluia Verse
Whoever keeps the word of Christ,
the love of God is truly perfected in him.

Gospel Portion
Jesus said to his disciples, “A rich man had a steward
who was reported to him for squandering his property.

So the steward worked with his master’s debtors to reduce their debts on the record (and to the proper level) as he is relieved of his duties (100 to 50 olive oil and 100 to 80 wheat measures).

And the master commended that dishonest steward for acting prudently.
For the children of this world
are more prudent in dealing with their own generation
than the children of light.

The steward made right the promissory notes for the debtors of the master.
Thus partially atoning for his previous theft and maybe get some help from those he made whole.

I did not know that.

That is why he was praised.

Peace be with you,
Deacon Gerry

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