Jesus raised his eyes

Greetings on this the Memorial of Saint Catherine of Siena, Virgin and Doctor of the Church
Readings: Acts 5:34-42; PS 27:1, 4, 13-14; Jn 6:1-15
Notes:

Jesus raising his eyes is an often used description in the Gospels.
As a literary device it is expressing the importance of the encounter and the focus of the Christ. As a theological expression it is the importance of focusing on the Father and on His Children.

Each encounter in the Gospel of John noted here (John 6, John 11 and John 17), Jesus directs our attention to the Father and to the ones in need – ourselves.

  • Jesus raised his eyes and saw the large crowd (Jn 6:5).
  • Jesus raised his eyes and said, “Father, I thank you for hearing me (Jn 11:41).
  • Jesus rasied his eyes to heaven (Jn 17:1).

Let us too raise our eyes to the Father and to the needs of others.

From Franciscans, a wonderful reflection on the life and spirituality of Catherine of Siena.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/franciscan-spirit-blog/st-catherine-of-siena-the-feisty-dominican

First reading
Gamaliel said to those who oppose these Apostles of Jesus:

For if this endeavor or this activity is of human origin,
it will destroy itself.

But if it comes from God, you will not be able to destroy them;
you may even find yourselves fighting against God.”

As for the Apostles, they did not stop teaching and proclaiming the Christ, Jesus.

Responsorial Psalm
One thing I seek: to dwell in the house of the Lord.

The LORD is my light and my salvation;
whom should I fear?
The LORD is my life’s refuge;
of whom should I be afraid?

Alleluia Verse
One does not live on bread alone,
but on every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.

Gospel Portion
When Jesus raised his eyes and saw that a large crowd was coming to him:

Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks,
and distributed them to those who were reclining,
and also as much of the fish as they wanted.
When they had had their fill, he said to his disciples,
“Gather the fragments left over,
so that nothing will be wasted.”
So they collected them,
and filled twelve wicker baskets with fragments
from the five barley loaves that had been more than they could eat.

Peace be with you,
Deacon Gerry

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