Come Holy Spirit

Greetings on this the Monday of the Fifth Week of Easter
Readings: Acts 14:5-18; PS 115:1-2, 3-4, 15-16; Jn 14:21-26
Notes: We are often trapped in habits of action and thinking. We need Divine Aid to see the Divine clearly.

In the first reading the people reluctantly begin to see a new Way.

Soon we celebrate two events Jesus made prophecy: Ascension and Pentecost.

Each again pointing as Moses declared to the truthfulness of Jesus:

  • By virtue of the supernatural event itself.
  • By virtue of his prophecy of it.
  • By witness to the enduring, abundant divine love showered upon us through him.

First reading
After Paul’s healing a man crippled from birth, the people of Lystra wanted to honor the Greek understanding of the divine rather than the revelation of the Good News of Jesus Christ.

Think of it.

  • Saul, now Paul, once believed in a violent suppression of The Way.
  • Lystra wanted to praise their idols of silver and gold, for the gift of healing.

Both Paul and the people of Lystra needed help them break through their habits:

  • Paul heard the voice of the Resurrected Lord.
  • Lystra saw the healing of a cripple and the preaching about the Resurrected Lord.
  • Soon we will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit to remind us of all that Jesus told the Apostles.

In bestowing his goodness,
he did not leave himself without witness,
for he gave you rains from heaven and fruitful seasons,
and filled you with nourishment and gladness for your hearts.”
Even with these words, they scarcely restrained the crowds
from offering sacrifice to them.

Responsorial Psalm
Not to us, O Lord, but to your name give the glory.

Alleluia Verse
The Holy Spirit will teach you everything
and remind you of all I told you.

Gospel Portion
“I have told you this while I am with you.
The Advocate, the Holy Spirit
whom the Father will send in my name —
he will teach you everything
and remind you of all that I told you.”

Peace be with you,
Deacon Gerry

2 thoughts on “Come Holy Spirit

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