Two-edged Sword

Greetings on this the Saturday of the First Week in Ordinary Time
Readings: Heb 4:12-16; PS 19:8, 9, 10, 15; Mk 2:13-17

Two-edged

Two-edged or double-edged sword idiom in literature means the reality in question has both a positive and negative aspect to it.

As we continue the reading of the Letter to the Hebrews the many aspects of this saying come to focus.

  1. God sees all things, good and bad.
  2. God’s word penetrates between soul and spirit.
  3. God sympathizes with our weakness.
  4. God offers the confidence to trust Him to receive mercy and grace.

He sees

His intent is to refresh us.
What he offers is perfect, trusthworthy, clear and pure.
His laws are true and just.

Taxing Business

Did Levi listen to John?
The gospel of Luke recalls ‘even the tax collectors came to be baptized, and they asked him, “Teacher, what should we do?” He said to them, “Collect no more than the amount prescribed for you.”

Levi, son of Alphaeus, A/K/A Matthew came to his senses when Jesus called him.
He gathered all the tax collectors who worked for him into a single banquet to meet Jesus. Some were already followers of Jesus and some meeting hi for the first time.

Did Zacchaeus listen to John?
Zacchaeus another tax collector (Luke 19) promised half his possession to the poor and if any were defrauded he will pay back 4 times the amount.

The Positive and the Negative

The positive is eternal life and joy in this life.
The negative is the loss of worldliness and following the allure of the appetite.

Doctor Us!

If we allow the two-edged sword to challenge us we’ll be able to act rightly.
All are sinners, all are in the image of God and all are called to the likeness of God.

Peace be with you,
Deacon Gerry

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.